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  1. 1989-1993 12 valve Cummins Engine Troubleshooting

    89-93 Fuel system troubleshooting

    Engine won’t start:

    Bleed the air out of the system

    If you are starting your Cummins for the first time, it is required to “bleed” the air out of the injector lines by loosening the injector line nut just enough to allow fuel and air to escape the line while you are cranking the engine. It is usually required to do at least 3 injector lines. Tightening the line nut while you are still cranking the engine is the best way. This is also a good way to verify that the injector pump’s shut down solenoid is allowing fuel to the injector. If your supply fuel line is loose, it is possible to draw air into the fuel system at that point, so if you suspect you are not getting rid of the air in the system check your supply line connections. These engines

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  2. 2003-2009 Common Rail Cummins Engine Troubleshooting

    Trouble with your Common Rail Cummins? Check back soon for some answers- in the meantime call.
     
     
    Knowledgebase Topic:
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  3. 1998.5-2002 24 valve Cummins Engine Troubleshooting

    98.5-02 Fuel System Troubleshooting

    Engine won’t start:

    Bleed the air out of the system

    If you are starting your Cummins for the first time, it is helpful to “bleed” the air out of the injector lines by loosening the injector line nut just enough to allow fuel and air to escape the line while you are cranking the engine. It is usually required to do at least 3 injector lines. Tightening the line nut while you are still cranking the engine is the best way. This is also a good way to verify that the injector pump’s shut down solenoid is allowing fuel to the injector. If your supply fuel line is loose, it is possible to draw air into the fuel system at that point, so if you suspect you are not getting rid of the air in the system check your supply line connections. These engines should have between 7-15 psi of

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  4. 1994-1998 12 valve Cummins Engine Troubleshooting

    94-98 Fuel system troubleshooting

    Engine won’t start:

    Bleed the air out of the system

    If you are starting your Cummins for the first time, it is required to “bleed” the air out of the injector lines by loosening the injector line nut just enough to allow fuel and air to escape the line while you are cranking the engine. It is usually required to do at least 3 injector lines. Tightening the line nut while you are still cranking the engine is the best way. This is also a good way to verify that the injector pump’s shut down solenoid is allowing fuel to the injector. If your supply fuel line is loose, it is possible to draw air into the fuel system at that point, so if you suspect you are not getting rid of the air in the system check your supply line connections. These engines should have between 18-30 psi or

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  5. Throttle Pedal Identification

    03-04 Non-Adjustable

    We do not sell bracket kits for these pedals yet since it is really simple to add an arm to. We do have some pictures if you need a little help getting started in the right direction.

    03-04 Factory Ford Replacement. If you have this pedal order SKU #3088.

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  6. Cummins Engine Information

    PICKING A CUMMINS ENGINE

    There are three types of fuel systems used on the 5.9 Cummins engines, and these differences are the only major aspects that set them apart from each other. The engines are universal as far as transmission mounting, if a tranny fits one engine, it will fit another (providing the proper adapter plate is used). For states with emissions inspections, the general rule is to go with an engine of the same year as, or newer than the implant truck. Check with your local emissions inspector for specific laws that apply to your project.

    Some preferences to consider are fuel economy, horse power and torque, mechanical or electronically controlled fuel system, noise level, ease of installation, governed RPM limit, and purchase price.

    Some customers have inquired about utilizing a Cummins Industrial engine for their conversion, please read more about Industrial engines below!

    The Cummins Industrial engines were used in School

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  7. 1991 - 1997 Ford F-150 & Bronco

    1991 – 1997 Ford F-150 Conversion Overview

    Information for all F-150 and Bronco models 1991 - 1997: 

    If you’re looking to maximize fuel economy in your F-150 or Bronco then you have come to the right place.  The professionals at Diesel Conversion Specialists have created a kit that is full of components to help you place a Cummins engine into your truck and retain factory functions at the same time.

    Cummins 4BT Engine Information

    Essentially a 4 cylinder version of the 6BT, the 4BT Cummins shares the same pistons, injectors, connecting rods, & valve train design as the 5.9L 12v Cummins.
    Cummins currently manufacturers the 4BT engines for delivery trucks, marine, construction, agriculture, & other off-highway applications.
    4BT stands for: 4 cylinders, B-Series engine, Turbocharged. 

    Specs:

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  8. Chevy 1988-1999 4x4 with IFS

    Fitment of the Cummins engine is tight but results in a great conversion because you get to keep your IFS. 

    • Keep IFS ride quality
    • No Body Lift Required
    • Electric Cooling Fans
    • Water-to-Air Intercooler
    • Keep cruise control
    • Factory instrument cluster works- Gas and Diesel

     

    The space from the firewall to core support is limited.  You may be able to run the mechanical cooling fan but it will require a body or suspension lift and additional fabrication work.

    AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS

    Modern, electronically controlled transmissions are better suited for conversions than the automatics transmissions of yesteryear due to shift control, overdrive, and torque converter lookup.  The electronic controlled transmissions (4L60 & 4L80) do not require replacement valve-body, kick-down linkages, etc. it simply plug & play.  A throttle position sensor is required when

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  9. Ford F-450 & F-550 Conversions

     F450

    The Super Duty F-450 & F-550 trucks are a popular choice for conversion projects.   These vehicles combine the amenities of a modern pickup truck with very impressive towing and hauling capabilities.  The following information highlights some of the pertinent differences in the F-450/550 trucks as compared to Ford’s standard F-250/350 models.

     

    Gear Ratios and Tire size:   The larger Super Duty trucks offered axle ratios of 4.30:1, 4.88:1, and even 5.38:1.   Because a higher ratio number also means higher engine RPM, these ratios are considered deep as compared to an F-250’s 3.55:1

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  10. 2008-2010 Ford 5.4L or 6.8L

    Many times customers ask about converting 2008-2010 Ford ® 5.4 and 6.8 trucks to a diesel due to the fact that they can be purchased reasonably, or they already own the truck and would like diesel power. There is not too much difficulty with this conversion, as these trucks have the same frame and transmission mounting as the diesel versions. You should plan to drop the fuel tank and remove the electric fuel pump. This is explained further in the installation manual. Keep in mind that a new diesel exhaust system will also be required and a diesel radiator is also a good idea if you plan to do some considerable hauling. The 2008-2010 Ford radiator and intercooler swap requires more parts than the earlier 2003-2007 models- and if the parts are bought brand new they are fairly expensive.

    It is recommended that a F-250

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